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Norwegian Troll Cream

Norwegian troll cream (trollkrem)

  • Servings: 5
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Print

The end result of this Scandinavian recipe looks just as magical as the name makes out. It’s a fluffy and beautiful looking mousse that is traditionally eaten on New Year’s Eve in Norway.

Ingredients

  • ½ cup of lingonberry jam
  • 2 egg whites
  • ¼ tsp of vanilla extrac
  • Lingonberries (fresh or frozen) for a garnish

Directions

  1. In a large mixer bowl, beat the lingonberry jam and egg whites — this must be done vigorously until it has at least quadrupled in size. It should end up looking quite fluffy.
  2. Add the vanilla extract and beat a bit longer until it combines.
  3. Serve it up and garnish with some lingonberries.

Note — if the lingonberry jam is unsweetened or you simply wish to further sweeten the recipe, you may wish to add sugar to the mix.

Background: Norwegian troll cream (trollkrem)

Norwegian troll cream is usually made on New Year’s Eve. Served up in fancy glasses or bowls, it makes for a great dessert to serve at parties and celebrations to bring in the new year. 

There are numerous versions of where this fine recipe originated, and it’s difficult to know for certain.

While the origins of the name are a bit of a mystery, however, it may have something to do with the way some Norwegians would go out into the forest to freshly pick their berries for the recipe. And of course, in Norwegian mythology, trolls are said to live out in the wilderness. So, perhaps the name is some kind of nod back to the recipe’s key ingredient. 

WeWell, whatever the reason, it’s a magical name for a magical looking dessert.   

Scandification: Discovering Scandinavia.

Scandification explores and celebrates the magic of Scandinavia. Stay tuned and we’ll bring the essence of Scandinavia to you.

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